Category Archives: famous

Artist Talk: Steve McCurry at the Gallery of Photography

Steve McCurry

I was in the Gallery of Photography in Dublin last weekend, and got chatting with the lad behind the counter. Couldn’t help noticing that the forthcoming exhibition was of Steve McCurry’s work. Also couldn’t help noticing that Mr. McCurry will be giving an artist talk on March 3rd.

Most people will recognise the 1985 National Geographic cover above – the Afghan Girl image is one of the most famous to come out of the world of photojournalism. Some 17 years later, in  about 2002, a National Geographic team manage to locate the girl, now back in remote Afghanistan.

An education and a pleasure it will be indeed for those of you who manage to get a ticket for this artist talk on March 3rd (if they haven’t gone already – only 200 seats I believe).

Even if you can’t make the talk, the exhibition runs from Feb 17th to April 24th, 2011. It should be one of the highlights of the Irish photographic year

– Rory

Advertisements

The Forgotten Ones … RIP Milton Rogovin

 

Milton Rogovin (c) Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

Via my favourite photo blog, The Online Photographer, I learnt today that the great socialist photographer, Milton Rogovin, has died. He was 101.

Rogovin took up photography after being persecuted during the McCarthy era. Says the New York Times,

Mr. Rogovin was an optometrist whose business was decimated and his children shunned after he refused to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1958. An article published that year in The New York Times reported that friendly witnesses described him as “the chief Communist in the area.” He turned to photography because his “voice was essentially silenced,” as he once said. What followed was more than 40 years of powerfully straightforward pictures of others without voices: the poor and working class of Buffalo’s East Side and Lower West Side, Appalachia, Mexico, Chile and other countries.

A wonderful photographer, his last book was The Forgotten Ones, published in 2003.

A short film worth watching is available on youtube.

– Rory

Vivian Maier

 

(c) Vivian Maier

This story has turned up at various places around the internet this week. Vivian Maier was born in New York in 1926, and on days off work would stroll around the streets of New York taking pictures. Some 100,000+ frames of negatives have been found, many of which she has never seen printed herself. The story of how they were found, and what is happening to them can be read at the New York Times blog here.

– Rory

ADDENDUM: Best place to read more about Vivian Maier is on the blog page set up by John Maloof, who seems to have acquired most of her negatives, here.

About the find, he says

I acquired Vivian’s negatives while at a furniture and antique auction. From what I know, the auction house acquired her belongings from her storage locker that was sold off due to delinquent payments.

Goodbye’s and Hello’s

Kodachrome

I’ve never been a huge user of slide film, but you can’t dispute the joy of looking at a perfectly exposed slide. The colours can have a magic that we don’t often see in prints. The demise of Kodachrome has been well documented this year. Produced since 1935, it was an icon of photography in its own right and beloved of millions of photographers. Paul Simon put it in his own words –

Kodachrome

They give us those nice bright colors

They give us the greens of summers

Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day, Oh yeah

I got a Nikon camera

I love to take a photograph

So mama don’t take my Kodachrome away
If you took all the girls I knewWhen I was single

And brought them all together for one night

I know they’d never matchmy sweet imagination

everything looks WORSE in black and white

 

Some of the photographers we said goodbye to in 2010 were

Henry Miller (c) Peter Gowland

Peter Gowland, March 17th 2010

 

Demonstrators huddled in a doorway, seeking shelter from high-pressure fire hoses, in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963. (c) Charles Moore

Charles Moore, March 13th 2010

 

(c) Jim Marshall

Jim Marshall, March 24th 2010

 

Paul Newman, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Dennis Hopper, May 29th 2010

 

John Lennon (c) Brian Duffy

Duffy, May 31st, 2010

 

Kate Moss (c) Corinne Day

Corinne Day, August 27th 2010

 

So, with goodbye’s to some of the greats, lets look forward to 2011. Cork Analogue Photographers are welcoming new members (interested? leave a comment below). We are planning on printing and exhibiting the Faces Project, a portraiture project we shot during the Cork Live at the Marquee concerts. We will also hold a version of the Disposable Camera Day – probably along the lines of a Crappy Camera Day (crap camera? check. roll of film? check. day out? check!). So we’ll be out and about

All the best to everyone for 2011, have a happy and healthy New Year. I’m off for a drink now 🙂

– Rory

Of sexy cameras, W. Eugene Smith and Japan Exposures

W. Eugene Smith, Hitachi, Japan, 1962. Photograph by Kozo Amano

So I was dawdling around the web, looking at the sexy objects of desire flaunted shamelessly on Tokyo Camera Style, when I came across the above image of W. Eugene Smith standing on a wall adorned and surrounded by eight cameras of various descriptions.  Something about his pose, his outstretched gesticulating left arm being mimicked by a gesticulating lens in his right, the point of view from below … Well it’s just a cool photo, isn’t it?

Seems Tokyo Camera Style came upon the picture via Japan Exposures who quoted Jazz Loft Project Blog who said,

It was late in the year of 1961 when W. Eugene Smith and Carole Thomas traveled to Japan. Smith was hired via the fledgling  Japanese public relations firm Cosmo PR to produce photographs for a publication on behalf of the firm’s first client, Hitachi. This assignment, like Smith’s Pittsburgh project/expedition/ordeal, started out as a simple one that got complicated and ended up taking the better part of a year to complete. The end result appeared in 1963 as Japan . . . a chapter of image.

Which really is a long way round way of saying I saw this photo and I liked it 🙂

– Rory

BBC’s Genius of Photography – available on YouTube

(c) William klein

I tried to catch these when they were aired on terrestrial telly a few years ago, but I missed a few. Didn’t have one of those series-link-record-em-all magic boxes then either.  I’ve found bits of episodes occasionally since then around the web, but it was hard to find the whole series in one place.  Just came across a link today that seems to have all the episodes in one place together on YouTube – http://www.youtube.com/user/GeniusOfPhotography#g/p.

I am of course talking about the Genius of Photography series that was aired by the BBC back around 2006 (can’t remember exactly when). It was a good series, though not without it’s critics. A bit American-centric and very few female photographers profiled,  from what I remember. But an entertaining history of photography none the less – good television. Anyway, I’ll be watching the series again on YouTube over the next few weeks I think.

By the way, the above is a gratuitous use of a very famous William Klein shot, who is profiled in Episode 4.

 

– Rory

It’s just about being there

(c) William Eggleston

“Sometimes i’ll leave the house with a fully loaded camera and end up with nothing. It’s just about being there. Anywhere. Even the most uninteresting ugly or boring places can for an instant become magical to me” – WILLIAM EGGLESTON